British Airways worker has gone on the run in India, having been accused of running a £3 million immigration scam for five years from his Heathrow check-in desk.

The unnamed suspect worked at Terminal 5 as a supervisor.

He allegedly took advantage of a loophole to fly customers with important visa documents, charging them £25,000 a time.

Police are working with Indian authorities to try and trace the 24-year-old man, who disappeared with his BA ground services partner after being arrested and bailed.

As part of the scam, he got customers, mostly from India, to travel to the UK on a temporary visitor visa where he arranged for them to fly elsewhere, typically Canada.

Other clients were UK-based asylum claimants who feared being sent back to their country of origin.

Canadian authorities raised the alarm after years of British Airways flights to Toronto or Vancouver on which arrivals would immediately declare asylum.

A probe discovered all were checked in by the same man.

He falsely verified the travellers had an Electronic Travel Authorisation (eTA) to enter a chosen country.

An eTA can be applied for by a passenger only in their country of origin. Without the suspect’s help, it would have been rejected.

He would also process passengers at the boarding gate.

He was arrested on January 6, 2024, but was released on bail.

The suspect has fled to India where he has allegedly purchased several homes.

A source told The Sun: “He exploited a loophole knowing that immigration checks are no longer carried out by officials but are left to airline staff.

“By inputting wrong data, and claiming eTA documents had been secured, he got people to countries they had no permission to enter in the first place.

“On arrival, the bogus passengers would shred their documents and claim asylum.

“Many jetted to Britain to pay him to get them to Canada.

“Others had been stuck in the UK immigration system for up to 10 years, and feared being sent back to their country of origin.

“It was an ingenious plan which has made him millions over the years.”

“No one knows yet the full extent of what’s gone on.”

British Airways has since terminated the contracts of the supervisor and his partner.

A spokesperson for the airline said: “We’re assisting the authorities with their investigation.”

Airlines usually check that passengers meet the entry requirements for their destination.

Passengers with visas have a manual visa check before their boarding pass is validated.